Results for Technologies

Developers with XML Content Skills in Demand

An explosion in demand for developers who know how to build, manage and update dynamic XML-based content is coming -- starting this year, at least according to a study by Zapthink. See why developers who know how to use XML to deliver smart and inexpensive content solutions for end users will create new job opportunities.

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Dynamic Content to Spur Demand for XML Skills

In 2003, enterprise developers and end users are spending more time trying to find and format content than they spend creating it. See why ZapThink says this trend will create a huge opportunity for developers skilled in XML and web services to provide cost-effective solutions to their companies.

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Java, Microsoft Drivers on Web Services Road

Developers familiar with Java and Microsoft driver technologies (JDBC and ODBC) will see a boon in XML-enabled tools in 2003, according to a leading provider of drivers and tools. See why SQL is for data at rest and XML is for data in motion, as DataDirect Technologies works with leading SQL vendors Oracle, Microsoft, Sybase and others.

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Driving ODBC, JDBC Drivers to XML Web Services

It will get much easier in 2003 for developers using ODBC and JDBC to upgrade to XML-based web services, according to DataDirect Technologies, one of the leading providers of database driver technologies to software providers and end users. See how DataDirect is working with leading vendors, including Oracle, Microsoft, Sybase and key Java developers, to bring strong XML support to SQL data.

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Giga's 2003 Developer's Guide to Web Services

Giga Information Group says that despite a slow start, web services in 2003 have the capability to turn application integration into a "Killer App." In this wide-ranging interview with Giga vice president Uttman Narsu, see why technology and standards are now in place (or will be in early 2003) to empower web services developers to do some neat integration projects.

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Giga's 2003 Developer's Guide to Web Services

Giga Information Group says that despite a slow start, web services in 2003 have the capability to turn application integration into a "Killer App." In this wide-ranging interview with Giga vice president Uttman Narsu, see why technology and standards are now in place (or will be in early 2003) to empower web services developers to do some neat integration projects.

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"Extranet" Web Services on the Rise in Europe

Developers, at least on the other side of the Atlantic, are aggressive in their use of web services technologies. Borland, in a survey released at its BorCon 2002 in London, found more than half of respondents were looking at web services to help with B2B, B2C, supply chain and remote employee access.

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W3C Last Call Goes Royalty Free

The W3C wants to make sure that technologies that are adopted -- or even considered -- as web services standards be available to ISVs and end users on a royalty-free basis. Failing that, the group wants to put in place work-around policies that will make sure work on web services standards doesn't drag. After more than a year of discussion and back-and-forth proposals, the W3C last week released its Last Call document lining out its Royalty-Free Patent Policy.

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Hands-On: 7 Keys To Building a Better Web Service

For developers looking to unlock the secrets to a successful web services project, Kirby Turner, a Solution Developer with developer services and integration firm Avanade Inc. offers a keen insight: A web service, he says, is "simply a programmable application logic accessed by using standard Internet protocols." Turner uses this core idea as a basis for his "7 keys to building successful web services." In these tips, Turner touches on many questions, ranging from using registries, setting security, and even the vexing debate over how much XML hand-coding does a developer really need to know.

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5 Steps to Energizing Your Development Career

If you feel like your enterprise development career has hit a rough patch, Ed Roman, CEO of The Middleware Company, has 5 Steps to Energize Your Career.

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