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JavaOne: Unlocking the ESB Secrets

During JavaOne, devs will get a much better look at how an ESB (Enterprise Service Bus) might boost their careers. Dave Chappell, one of Java's foremost experts on JMS and integration, in his latest book spells out why ESBs will transform how Java devs think about APIs, data sharing and workflow.

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JavaOne Review: Unlocking the ESB Secrets

During JavaOne, devs will get a much better look at how an ESB (Enterprise Service Bus) might boost their careers. Dave Chappell, one of Java's foremost experts on JMS and integration, in his latest book spells out why ESBs will transform how Java devs think about APIs, data sharing and workflow.

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JavaDev'06: ESBs Will Turn Devs into Integrators

Beginning this week, Integration Developer News begins our countdown to JavaOne 2004 with a series that poses the question: "What changes are coming for the career Java developer in the next two years?" This week, Dave Chappell, one of Java's foremost experts on JMS and integration, spells out why Java devs needs to think "outside the stack," to learn skills that will better tie Java into .NET and other non-Java platforms. The Enterprise Service Bus, he says, will transform how Java devs think about APIs, data sharing and workflow.

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DataPower Optimizes XML Apps for Finance

DataPower, a small, private start-up in Cambridge, Mass., is pushing the envelope on XML-optimized firmware for devs implementing web services. See how the company gives IT teams snap-in support for web secure-XML transformations that integrate with the financial sector's demands. Also, review the latest free program.

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How Python Boosts App Integration -- Part II

As Sun and Microsoft both look to embrace scripting languages in web services run by Java and .NET, IDN spoke with Alex Martelli, the author of O'Reilly's leading books on the topic of Python in the enterprise -- "Python in a Nutshell" and "Python Cookbook." In Part 2, Martelli offers insights on Python's different approach to working with Win32, Java,.NET, and even C/C++ apps.

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Software Vendors Pile on with XQuery Plans

Despite database vendor disharmony over web services workflow (or choreography), they do agree on something: XQuery, the proposed W3C standard for querying XML data and documents. Last week, the W3C began reviewing a test suite for XQuery. Microsoft, IBM, Oracle, Informix and Software AG are among those with tools, roadmaps and demos on offer.

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IBM, Sun To Summit Over "Open" Java

IBM says they'll meeting with Sun next week to discuss creating a more "open" Java. News of the meeting follows months of failed attempts between IBM and Sun to unify over an "open" Java tools standards. But, Sun's software VP Jonathan Schwartz called IBM's plan "bonky." Word of the meeting follows an "open letter" sent by IBM to Sun asking to work together on such a project.

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10 Tips for How To Get Your CEO on Board

As web services continue to mature, many developers are getting eager to tie them into their "glass house" legacy systems. To take that step, however, downstream .NET, Java and C# developers will need approvals from top line managers. An exec from Attachmate, provider of legacy emulation and integration, provides IDN with 10 good tips for winning them over.

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Why Poor "Tool-ability" Is Hurting Java

A group of leading Java vendors, including Sun, Oracle and BEA, are making the case that Java tools have become too complex and too expensive to build. To help solve the problem, 10 leading Java tools vendors have formed a community to focus on improving Java's "tool-ability." IDN looks at the JTC efforts, why IBM and Borland aren't on-board and what others say about Java's Future.

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Case Study: Brokerages Push XML for Finance

The country's largest brokerage firms are expanding basic XML specifications to define a new open and standard markup language for financial services. FpML v2.0 (Financial Products Markup Language) will provide developers important new guidelines for building B2B web services. But, even if you're not in finance, see how FpML highlights some keen insights on how your own industry should use Open Standards to construct web services transactions.

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OASIS Adopts SPML 1.0 Spec, On To SPML 2.0

SPML 1.0, an XML approach for cross-platform provisioning and for secure web services, was adopted Nov. 3 by OASIS. Supported by heavyweights IBM, Microsoft, CA, work is already underway for SPML 2.0 to bring more provisioning and security features to web services and SOA devs. Get the latest on SPML's use, the final docs, and insights from Darran Rolls, chair of the OASIS Service Provisioning Markup Language Technical Committee, for using SPML.

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Hands-On: 7 Keys To Building a Better Web Service

The secrets to a successful web services project arise from one key insight, says Kirby Turner, a Solution Developer with developer services and integration firm Avanade Inc. That is: A web service is simply "a programmable application logic accessed by using standard Internet protocols." In this article, Turner touches on seven keys to success, including using registries, setting security and even the vexing debate over how much XML hand-coding does a developer really need to know.

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