Amazon Offers Relational Database in the Cloud

Amazon Web Services is taking cloud-based data to the next level by offering RDS, a relational database from the cloud, enabling users to affordably automate cumbersome database administration tasks. 

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Amazon Web Services is taking cloud-based data to the next level by offering RDS, a relational database from the cloud, enabling users to affordably automate cumbersome database administration tasks. 

To encourage use, ASW will charge no up-front fees or require investment, and customers only pay for the resources they use.

“For almost two years, many AWS customers have taken advantage of the simplicity, reliability, and seamless scalability that Amazon SimpleDB provides,” said Adam Selipsky, Vice President, Amazon Web Services, in a statement. “However, many customers have told us that their applications require a relational database. That’s why we built Amazon RDS, which combines a familiar relational database with automated management and the instant scalability of the AWS cloud,” he added.

Amazon RDS includes a MySQL database; which means the code, applications, and tools devs use with their existing MySQL databases work seamlessly together. Further, Amazon RDS automatically handles common database administration tasks including setup and provisioning, patch management, and backup and stores the backups for as long as the customer wants, the company said.

Customers can also scale the compute and storage resources associated with their database instances through a simple API call, the company said. Amazon RDS is easy to deploy and simple to manage, the company said.

Early customers were positive about Amazon’s ARD to provide an answer to scalability, one of the more costly aspects of database deployment. 

Amazon RDS currently supports five DB Instance Classes, as follows:

  • Small : 1.7 GB memory, 1 ECU (1 virtual core with 1 ECU), 64-bit platform.
  • Large: 7.5 GB memory, 4 ECUs (2 virtual cores with 2 ECUs each), 64-bit platform
  • Extra Large: 15 GB of memory, 8 ECUs (4 virtual cores with 2 ECUs each), 64-bit platform
  • Double Extra Large: 34 GB of memory, 13 ECUs (4 virtual cores with 3,25 ECUs each), 64-bit platform
  • Quadruple Extra Large: 68 GB of memory, 26 ECUs (8 virtual cores with 3.25 ECUs each), 64-bit platform

 “I found Amazon RDS to be a very efficient way to deploy MySQL. The instance is up and running in minutes, and very sensible defaults are baked in, “said David Tompkins, a computer scientist at Adobe Systems’ Advanced Technology Labs, in a statement. “The [RDS] APIs provide streamlined administration, with an ability to programmatically automate administration functions—which is a key feature in cloud-based applications,” he added.

 

Separately, Amazon Web Services said it has also cut on all Amazon EC2 On-Demand compute instances, while prices for Linux-based instances were cut 15%.




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