OASIS Publishes WS- Standards for Networked Devices

OASIS has published three proposed Web services standards to make it easier to find, share, and control printers, storage, sensors, cellphone, PDAs and a variety of non-traditional smart devices hooked up to a network.  The new standards include Web Services Dynamic Discovery (WS-Dynamic Discovery), SOAP Over User Datagram Protocol (UDP), and Devices Profile for Web Services (DPWS).

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OASIS has published three proposed Web services standards to make it easier to find, share, and control printers, storage, sensors, cellphone, PDAs and a variety of non-traditional smart devices that may be hooked up to a computer network. 

The new standards include Web Services Dynamic Discovery, SOAP Over User Datagram Protocol (UDP), and Devices Profile for Web Services (DPWS).

 

“These standards make it possible for a new generation of enterprise-enabled resources to be developed which will automatically be discovered and function seamlessly together,” said Alain Regnier of Ricoh, co-chair of the OASIS WS-DD Technical Committee, in a statement.  

Beyond traditional network devices, the latest standards work by OASIS WS-DD would allow web services to link up with building security devices, entertainment systems, energy management equipment and remote controls.

OASIS WS-DD Will Expand Reach of SOA, Web Services
OASIS’ latest standards describe the web services for networked devices, and detail how web services can dynamically discover such devices. The standards also enable the “secure exchange” of messages to and from the connected device, as well as enable devices to subscribe and receive events from a web service.

In its FAQ on WS-DD, OASIS stated: 
Enterprise applications today are more dynamic than ever; they achieve greater scale through loosely coupled architecture and dynamic runtime composition. A standard Web services discovery protocol provides an interoperable way to locate Web services components of these composite applications.

DPWS provides a profile that narrows the referenced specifications, increasing the likelihood of common implementation choices and interoperability for devices. Applications can be programmed to use services embedded in devices using the same development tools that are used to access other web services on the network.

 

The purpose of the Web Services Discovery and Web Services Devices Profile (WS-DD) Technical Committee is to define:

  • A lightweight dynamic discovery protocol to locate web services that composes with other Web service specifications;
  • A binding of SOAP to UDP (User Datagram Protocol), including message patterns, addressing requirements, and security considerations; and
  • A profile of Web Services protocols consisting of a minimal set of implementation constraints to enable secure Web service messaging, discovery, description, and eventing on resource-constrained endpoints.

Yoshikazu Sugimoto, Senior Vice President, Advanced Imaging and Network Technologies, Ricoh Americas Corp., said his company was pleased the WS-DD standards are now approved standards. “They will improve the user experience with connected devices and enable a whole new world of enterprise scenarios,” he said in a statement.

While it may be tempting to pigeon-hole the effort as an outreach to niche hardware and device vendors, that would be a mistake.  Even the largest enterprise software vendors voiced support for the latest OASIS efforts to expand the reach of a computer network.

“WS-DD expands the scope of the WS-* stack to encompass an exciting range of devices used by both consumers and professionals. Together, WS-Discovery, SOAP-over-UDP, and DPWS define a lightweight footprint that offers the potential to broaden the reach of Web services,” said Toby Nixon of Microsoft, who also co-chairs the WS-DD Committee at OASIS, in a statement.  

 

The WS-DD standards are offered on a royalty-free basis, OASIS said. Any company, non-profit group, government, academic institution, and individual can participate in the OASIS WS-DD Technical Committee. Members and non-members can access the archives of the committee’s work and OASIS said it hosts an open mail list for public comment.




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