New Book Details Service Component Architecture

A new book, "Understanding SCA" aims to detail everything developers need to know to build business applications using Service Component Architecture. The book is co-authored by Jim Marino, of Metaform Systems and Active Endpoints' Michael Rowley, published by Addison-Wesley Professional.

Tags: SCA, Applications, Technologies, Business, Developers, Composition, Service Components,


A new book, "Understanding SCA" aims to detail everything developers need to know to build business applications using Service Component Architecture.

The book is co-authored by Jim Marino, of Metaform Systems and Active Endpoints' Michael Rowley, published by Addison-Wesley Professional.

"In Understanding SCA, we set out to do more than just describe the technology in purely technical terms," said Rowley, CTO, Active Endpoints, in the statement. "Instead, we have tried hard to make SCA concepts accessible to working developers, many of whom are not computer scientists. We hope to do for SCA what Kernigan and Ritchie did for C in the late 1970s: produce a comprehensible and definitive description of what SCA can achieve in the development of modern business applications."

Without SCA, developers who want to build applications from reusable parts have to overcome serious technological challenges, according to a statement from the authors. Even if developers use Java or Microsoft .NET, they will still be confronted with many parts to learn.

SCA is supported by leading application and middleware companies, including IBM, Oracle, SAP, Progress Software, Software AG, Sun Microsystems and others. Since 2007, OASIS, a not-for-profit standards-setting body, has managed the SCA standards process through seven technical committees for various aspects of SCA.

OASIS describes the goals and purposes of SCA as follows:

SCA is based on the idea that business function is provided as a series of services, which are assembled together to create solutions that serve a particular business need. These composite applications can contain both new services created specifically for the application and also business function from existing systems and applications, reused as part of the composition. SCA provides a model both for the composition of services and for the creation of service components, including the reuse of existing application function within SCA compositions.

SCA is a model that aims to encompass a wide range of technologies for service components and for the access methods which are used to connect them. For components, this includes not only different programming languages, but also frameworks and environments commonly used with those languages. For access methods, SCA compositions allow for the use of various communication and service access technologies that are in common use, including, for example, Web services, messaging systems and Remote Procedure Call (RPC).
Understanding SCA co-author Marino says SCA is the best way for engineers to reduce complexity and more effectively develop service-based applications, adding "Our new book is ideal for technologists to not only learn the concepts behind SCA, but also to gain a deeper understanding of how SCA relates to other enterprise technologies and how to best use it in practice."

For more information on "Understanding SCA," published by Addison-Wesley.



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