Red Hat JBoss Drives ‘Open Choice’ for Mid-Tier

Red Hat wants to open up the game for Java in the enterprise with its JBoss Open Choice application platform. The strategy aims to make it easier to develop and deploy applications and redefine the use of Java in the enterprise.

Tags: JBoss Open Choice, Open Choice, Programming Models, Java, Customers, Open Choice Strategy, Platform,


Red Hat wants to open up the game for Java in the enterprise with its JBoss Open Choice application platform. The recently-announced strategy aims to make it easier to develop and deploy applications and redefine the use of Java in the enterprise.

JBoss Open Choice aims to provide devs a single common platform from which they can use different programming models. The strategy comes as more enterprise developers are using Java in conjunction with other programming and deployment models, a Red Hat executive said.

"With an uncertain future and the ever-changing world of Java, the JBoss Open Choice strategy is designed to provide customers with the confidence, to choose the programming and deployment model that works for them without sacrificing performance," said Craig Muzilla, vice president, of Red Hat's middleware business unit (which includes all JBoss offerings). Despite all of the market shifts, Red Hat aims to remain a trusted source for valuable and innovative solutions in the Java market," he added.

JBoss Open Choice will be designed to allow users to configure a platform with only the precise services they need, and additionally select any framework, programming model, APIs and languages they want, according to Muzilla. Notably, the new strategy will support many popular light-weight development frameworks such as Spring, Seam, Struts, and Google Web Toolkit; component models like Pojo and OSG and dynamic languages such as Groovy.

Inside the Customer Demand
For JBoss' Open Choice Strategy

Red Hat's web site describes the JBoss Open Choice strategy as a reaction to customer demands for more ways to use open source application server platforms to cut operations costs. In part, Red Hat's customer team web posting described the genesis and purpose JBoss Open Choice this way:
Before migrating to JBoss, many of our customers start out on expensive, complex closed-source application servers from the two largest commercial vendors, but soon realize that the value they're receiving from these proprietary vendors fails to justify the expensive license costs that range from $15,000 to $40,000 per CPU and the ongoing annual support and maintenance costs at 20% of the license fee.

In addition to the high-cost, we believe many existing Java application servers can't easily address the variety that exists in today's market.

Our customers have spoken - the one size fits all approach taken by the two largest proprietary application server providers no longer works for today's dynamic Java environment. Our customers use a variety of programming models and require lighter- weight platforms to support these, backed by a single management footprint - this is something that these vendors simply don't provide today.

JBoss Open Choice, at its core, is about [the] flexibility… to choose the programming model that fits your application - Java EE, POJOs, OSGi, Spring, Rich Applications or whatever comes next. Our JBoss customers use all of these programming models in their environments, but today, have to use multiple platforms with different footprints, management tools and steep learning curves.

The JBoss Open Choice strategy is intended to provide our customers with the flexibility they need both today and tomorrow, while at the same time, making it easier for operations teams to manage through the evolutions in programming models that occur over time.
One key technology underlying the vision to simplify management of multiple programming models and environments will be Red Hat's recently-announced JBoss Microcontainer application platform architecture, the company said.

At its center, Red Hat intends the JBoss Open Choice strategy to become a new application server architecture, where the JBoss Microcontainer separates core enterprise services from the various other container and framework choices on the market today, Red Hat team members said.




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