Amazon’s AWS Offers Public Data as Free ‘Cloud’ Service

Amazon Web Services is taking 'cloud services' to a new level with its launch of "Public Data Sets on AWS," on-demand centralized repositories of public data sets that users can integrated into their AWS cloud-based applications - at no charge.

Tags: AWS, Public Data, Web Services, Amazon EC2, Cloud Services, Customer, AWS Officials,


Amazon Web Services is taking 'cloud services' to a new level with its launch of "Public Data Sets on AWS," on-demand centralized repositories of public data sets that users can integrated into their AWS cloud-based applications - at no charge.

AWS will host the public data sets at no charge. Users only for the compute and storage they require to tie in the data to their own applications, Amazon's AWS officials said.

Available AWS data sets span a wide array of public domain data, including:
  • U.S. Census Bureau data,
  • 3-D chemical structures provided by Indiana University, and
  • Human Genome data from Ensembl.
  • AWS plans to add data from a wide range of economic statistics from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, as well as government and university scientific data sets.

    AWS's decision to bring data to its on-demand or cloud services model is aimed to help spur customer innovation for new types of business-centric applications using the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2), AWS officials said.

    "For over five years AWS has been working to lower the barriers to entry, level the playing field, and make it possible for our customers to be successful based on their ideas, not on their resources," said Adam Selipsky, Vice President of Product Management and Developer Relations for Amazon Web Services, in a statement. "Public Data Sets on AWS is the latest of these efforts, and we can't wait to see the discoveries and innovations that could stem from this ecosystem."

    AWS officials also noted another benefit to AWS-resident public data - ease and efficiency of access.

    In the past it took many hours to locate, download and customize large data sets like the Human Genome and U.S. Census data, AWS' Selipsky said. With its expanded data offerings, any user can employ Amazon EC2 to more quickly access these large data sets -- and potentially start computing on the data within minutes, he added.



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