Savvion BusinessManager 7.5 Opens BPM To Business-Users

Major BPM player Savvion is shipping next-gen technology it says will finally allow business users to create and manage business processes. IDN looks at Savvion BusinessManager 7.5, BPM suite.

Tags: Business, BPM, Savvion, Business Users, Management, First BPM Product, Ketabchi,


Major BPM player Savvion is shipping next-gen technology it says will finally allow business users to create and manage business processes. Savvion latest BPM suite introduces what the company calls "realistic ways" for business users to model processes.

For example, users can model and describe their processes without having to know modeling notations, and they can draw process diagrams right on their computer screens with the computer's mouse, Savvion execs said. Additionally, people working on projects like a new product, which requires process management abilities like task management and alternate paths, can convert their project activities into executable applications, the company said.

Savvion BusinessManager 7.5 includes:
  • Tabular Process Definition--To let users easily describe their processes the way they are used to working.
  • Project-Oriented Processes--To address the requirements of project managers who need both Project Portfolio Management and BPM to do their work effectively.
  • Business Scheduler: To address large-scale scheduling requirements to automate and run scheduled activities and processes.

  • "BusinessManager 7.5 lets employees get involved immediately in the creation, deployment and use of BPM because there is no learning curve involved," said M.A. Ketabchi, founder, president and CEO of Savvion, in a statement. "The Savvion team has learned a lot since introducing the industry's first BPM product in 1999. We know that for a BPM initiative to be successful, it must be accessible and easy to use by all members of a business organization—and 7.5 is the first to make this truly possible."

    And with Savvion's Communications Enabled Business Process, employees can participate in a given process and complete activities via telephone when even if they don't have access to a computer, Ketabchi added.



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