MLB Says Web 2.0 Will Improve Baseball -- On Field and Off

Major League Baseball will be using Web 2.0 technologies from IBM to improve baseball - both on and off the field. MLB execs have plans to use Web 2.0 to help umpires, cut counterfeits, and bolster security for players and fans at all 30 baseball parks.

Tags: MLB, Baseball, IBM WebSphere, Historical Data, Ball, Authenticate, Umpire,


Web 2.0 is no longer sitting on the bench, at least as far as baseball is concerned. It's in the game, bigtime!

Major League Baseball will be using Web 2.0 technologies from IBM to improve baseball on and off the field. MLB execs say Web 2.0 could help improve officiating, cut counterfeits, and bolster security for players and fans at all 30 baseball parks.

Notably, MLB will use IBM WebSphere Portal's Web 2.0 collaboration capabilities to provide umpire crews better intelligence and historical data. The specially-developed portal app, called MLB's Umpire Desktop, will help officials gain advanced insight into players' behaviors, based on past performances or likely tendencies.

Aside from links to historical data, MLB will also use Web 2.0 to tap into 'real-time' data sources to provide umpires information about weather conditions, and offer ballpark security personnel more ways to identify potential risk factors.

"The IBM WebSphere Portal software architecture allows us to consolidate information from a variety of sources. It enables collaboration within our user community and provides a strong platform for future growth and development," said Mike Morris, Vice President of Application Development and Program Management for MLB, in a statement.

Off the field, Web 2.0 will help MLB fight against the sale of counterfeit baseball memorabilia To authenticate, license and sell baseball products to collectors - items such as home run balls, autographs, bases and name plates, etc -- in a more timely and accurate way, MLB will use IBM WebSphere Portal and Symbol handheld RFID wireless devices to identify the item as authentic, and also scan and catalog that item into an MLB-certified datastore.

MLB describes the system this way: After a fan catches a home run ball, a security guard will link up with the fan and place a unique hologram on the ball. The information will then be wirelessly up-loaded to an MLB data server (also IBM). In that way, sellers and buyers can verify the ball's (or other item's) its authenticity immediately

The IBM Web 2.0 technologies will be installed and managed by MLB's Office of the Commissioner, the MLB said.



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