ZSL Debuts Plug–ins for Enterprise Web 2.0

ZSL Inc., an information technology integrator, has released its Enterprise 2.0 Computing Framework built on IBM Websphere sMash and Service Oriented Architecture SOA. The framework allows businesses a virtual Web 2.0 to plugcapability, adding secure social networking services to current legacy assets.

Tags: Computing Framework, Enterprise, SOA, Websphere SMash, Technology, Platform, Social Networking,


ZSL Inc., an information technology integrator, has released its Enterprise 2.0 Computing Framework built on IBM Websphere sMash and Service Oriented Architecture SOA. The framework allows businesses a virtual Web 2.0 to plug-capability, adding secure social networking services to current legacy assets.

Enterprise 2.0 Computing Framework features a complete social networking platform that includes blogs, Wikis, forums, tagging, bookmarking and intelligent searching, will help businesses set up their internal social networking tools. It is targeting at midsized and large enterprises worldwide. However, the sub-components of the framework could be implemented as modules and lay the foundation for the full scale SOA, ZSL said.

ZSL is among the early adopter of IBM's WebSphere sMash, a dynamic Web application platform. IBM sMash enables ISVs to deliver dynamic Web 2.0 based applications using pre-existing assets written in PHP and Java, as well as reuse XML and RSS feeds.

"ZSL's Enterprise 2.0 Computing Framework built with IBM's newest Web 2.0 technology extends the reach of SOA and will enable our customers to effectively use the web as their SOA platform. Our Enterprise 2.0 Computing Framework provides a pragmatic approach to deliver the promise of Web 2.0 and SOA to meet true Service Oriented Enterprise requirements in a fundamentally different and more costeffective way," said Sudarshan Venkatraman, said ZSL's Chairman and CEO in a statement.

Forrester Research Inc. predicts enterprises investments in Web 2.0 technologies could reach $764 million by the end of 2008, and skyrocket to $4.6 billion by 2013.



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