Tips for Boosting Java Performance for Web Services

As more enterprise developers look to bridge Java, ASP/.NET and legacy assets together - a variety of performance issues arise…. Here are IDN's Best of the Web for developers looking for help.

Tags: Developers, Java, Web Services, Enterprise Developers, Process Management, Performance Tuning, Legacy Assets,



As more enterprise developers look to bridge Java, ASP/.NET and legacy assets together - a variety of performance issues arise…. Here are IDN's Best of the Web for developers looking for help with Java performance for both standalone and "cross-platform" traffic -- to better prep your Java assets for web services and/or integration projects.



1. Before worrying about node-to-node traffic performance, many developers suggest you focus on tuning stand-alone server performance. Java Performance Tuning has gathered one of the best one-stop performance tuning libraries IDN has found (including references, links and free code downloads). Many will help developers assess the current performance of their systems, and find ways to speed performance for web services deployments.



2. Many first-generation web services can operate asynchronously (independently of other processes), but enterprise developers may still need to pay special attention to process management. See why in this recent EarthWeb article extolling the virtues of an Asynchronous Process Manager .



3. The California Institute of Technology (CalTech) offered a seminar this semester on the best techniques for using Message Oriented Communications. This link offers some keen insights into what developers should keep in mind when working with message queues and queue managers (relays). http://www.cs.caltech.edu/~cs141/a/lectures/lecture6.pdf .



4. For Java developers trying to get their data and applications to work with COM objects, one developer suggests that developers generate Java class wrappers to call Microsoft MSMQ COM objects. See if this approach is for you and your enterprise.
http://www.execpc.com/~gopalan/mts/msmqserver.html
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5. For a growing number of enterprise developers looking to bridge Java and .NET, SOAP may be a top choice. But, as Systinet author Zdenek Svoboda points out, the SOAP spec does not mandate any particular encoding style, and developers are free to use of a wide array of choice. In this article from TheServerSide, see how your choice can affect the performance you end up with.





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