Survey: .NET, Java in SOA Horserace

An August survey from Evans Data Corp. finds a real .NET-vs-Java horserace for SOA dev platform supremacy. A recent surge in corporate use of Java and Open Source is dramatically closing the earlier .NET lead. Also, there are indications that many are still in transition from simple web services to full-fledged SOA. What else goes on?

Tags: SOA, Web Services, Java, Open Source, SOA Dev Platform, Survey, Web Services Projects,




An August survey from Evans Data Corp. finds a real .NET-vs-Java horserace for SOA dev platform supremacy. A recent surge in corporate use of Java and Open Source is dramatically closing the earlier .NET lead.

Evans August “Web Services Development Survey” finds that among those companies planning an SOA deployment, those who said they’d use Java increased slightly, but those who said they would use .NET dropped by 20%. But this apparent win for Java might not be what it seems. Note Exhibit A and Exhibit B from the current report and other Evans research 



  • .NET and Java for SOA are virtually tied, at present. .NET deployments for SOA were ahead at 31% (using or targeting), and now Java scores 28% (using or targeting) Further, about 20% of all companies expect to support both.

  • And among those companies in the Java camp, that doesn’t mean only the big commercial companies will benefit. "There's currently a lot of activity in the Open Source world, and particularly in the Eclipse communities, around SOA" said John Andrews, CEO of Evans Data Corp. "Most of the major players in that space are introducing new solutions aimed at SOA, and they are almost invariably Java-based. Open Source SOA looks poised to become a real force in the industry and consequently a serious contender to .NET"
    Further, the author of the study Joe McKendrick recently blogged at ZDnet the report’s final analysis confirms: [M]ost organizations are somewhere in the transitional stage between JBOWS stage (Just a Bunch of Web Services) and SOA. In fact, most have not gotten their arms around the various pieces needed to make up SOA: governance and registries, ESBs business process management, and service sharing/reuse.”
    Here are some other tidbits from the survey, which polled approximately 400 web services devs:

  • Three-quarters of all companies with web services plan to implement SOA.

  • 20+% have already adopted a formal SOA for company-wide adoption.

  • 70+% involved with a web services projects say they have experienced a cost saving. (Code re-use, automation of processes were primary reasons.)

  • The top challenge is ‘testing and validating’ web Services. Determining an ROI is almost as great a challenge

  • B2B projects are the most common uses for Web Services, followed by data integration




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