Sun Enters Phase 2 Java-.NET Interop

Sun and Microsoft engineers continue to work on up-the-stack interop between Java and .NET. Sun pledged to enable Java interop to Microsoft's Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) by developing and distributing open source implementations of key WS-specs. IDN spoke with a Sun exec, who lined out benefits to Java/J2EE devs for .NET interop.

Tags: Interop, Java, Web Services, Keller, Sun, Transport, Web Services Stack,


Sun and Microsoft engineers continue to work on up-the-stack interop between Java and .NET. Sun pledged to enable Java interop to Microsoft's Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) by developing and distributing open source implementations of key WS-specs.

Seamless integration between Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) and .NET will provide three (3) key benefits, Joe Keller, Sun's vice president of marketing for Java Web Services and Tools, As Keller sees it, these benefits are:
(1) Better enable devs to design and deploy end-to-end apps across Linux, Solaris and Windows;

(2) Better leverage a wide variety of legacy software assets; and

(3) To pave the way for greater adoption of web services and service-oriented architecture (SOA) -based application development by reducing the associated cost, complexity and risk.
Phase 2 Java/.NET Interop --
Well Beyond Single-Sign On

"We started off with single-sign on (SSO) agreement between .NET and Liberty," Keller said. "Sun and Microsoft recently reached an agreement on the implementation of WS-Management stack. The next step is that Sun is putting those web services implementations into the Java web services developer pack."

The result, Keller said, is that the core interop technology will become the web services stack for all Sun's Java products. Further, Sun will Open Source the technology to make the .NET-friendly Java web services stack available for other Java vendors. "Basically, we are implementing a broad number of these [interoperable] specs in our web services stack, including messaging specs, metadata, security and QoS [quality-of-service]. Everything we think you'll need for a next-gen interoperable application," Keller said.

Sun will leverage the interop stack technologies for their tools for Java Enterprise Systems and Solaris 10, Keller said.

"It's all about making the conversation more transparent. So, we see a tool where you can attach your objects whatever form they happen to be, and the tool iconifies and represents all sorts of things you can tie into that conversation, an ESB, a servlet, another service or a workflow object. It really does become a lot easier to understand and manipulate your services."

Prepping Interop Phase 2 for JavaOne 2006
"Phase 1 was getting interop at the transport to work, around WS-I and [of Sun] becoming a part of that and interop testing. The community is getting good at interop, and we've shown that interop is good at the transport level. So, this is Phase 2, the next step to get at a richer level of [interop] services so you can build apps for an true multi-platform SOA.

In fact, Keller said with these new levels of interconnects between java and .NET, developers will not have to bother with some trickier code-based interconnect issues. "Phase 2 will bring developers a transparency [for connecting their Java code to .NET]. This transparency goes beyond classes and objects and even Cobol copy books. You don't know what's across the wire, and frankly you don't care."

It all sounds great, but what assurances can Sun make to devs that all this interop technology will work?

"We are taking this up to Redmond to test and do changes to anything we need and deliver [Open Source] in the next couple of months. We hope to have all this ready for beta at JavaOne in May," Keller told IDN.



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